Desert Jewel Obstetrics and Gynecology - Courtney A. Hunt MD, FACOG - Scottsdale, AZ - Arizona
Desert Jewel Obstetrics and Gynecology - Courtney A. Hunt MD, FACOG - OBGYN - Scottsdale, AZ - Arizona
    Prenatal Care  
   

We are honored that you have chosen Dr. Courtney Hunt, Dr. Kim Hartzfeld, and the office staff at Desert Jewel Obstetrics and Gynecology to care for you and your baby during your pregnancy. We offer ultrasounds directly in our office for patient convenience and comfort, using state of the art equipment for 3D and 4D high resolution and superior, innovative diagnostic capabilities. With a new addition to your family, we understand that you will have questions and we would like to ease your mind and provide you with information to help you understand what to expect in the months to come.

Pregnancy Timeline
Safe Medications in Pregnancy
Cord Blood Collection
Diet and Exercise in Pregnancy
Frequently Asked Questions
Women's Newsletter

Pregnancy Timeline
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8-11 weeks: Please schedule your first OB visit during this time. At this visit, you will meet with Dr. Courtney Hunt or Dr. Kim Hartzfeld to discuss your pregnancy and what to expect in the nine months to come. In most cases, a pelvic exam will be done and a pap smear will be collected. If an ultrasound is performed in our office at your first visit, it will be brief to confirm the pregnancy and check the heart beat of the baby, but is not used for anatomical purposes. The ultrasound at your first visit may not be covered by your insurance policy. Prenatal labs will be collected at this first visit. A genetic screening lab for Cystic Fibrosis is recommended. Click here to learn more about Cystic Fibrosis screenings in prenatal care.

8-28 weeks: You will have an OB visit once every 4 weeks, until you reach the 28th week. Your growth progress will be monitored, and the fetal heart tones will be checked. Many mothers begin to feel kicking and fetal movement at approximately 20 weeks. Expect to have an ultrasound scheduled at approximately 18-20 weeks to check the anatomy of the baby. At about 24-28 weeks, a one hour glucose test will be scheduled to check your blood sugar levels during the pregnancy. If your blood type is Rh negative, you will receive a Rhogam shot at this visit.

28-36 weeks: Expect to schedule an OB visit every 2 weeks, until your 36th week. Fetal activity monitoring should begin at 30 weeks. At 36 weeks, a culture is done to check for Group B Strep in your pregnancy.

36 weeks- delivery: An OB appointment will be scheduled every week in our office, and a pelvic exam will be done starting at 37 weeks to check the dilation of your cervix. Please remember, no traveling once you reach 36 weeks in your pregnancy. In this last month, our office will do our best to set your mind at ease by answering any questions you may have. Also, if you have special requests for your delivery, please discuss these with Dr. Hunt or Dr. Hartzfeld before you are 36 weeks along so we can be sure to give you the delivery experience you desire. In the last four weeks of your pregnancy, you should relax as much as possible and go to bed early. Women who are well rested tend to have an easier time in labor, while tired women tend to have difficulty during labor. Have your hospital bags packed and readily accessible. These last weeks can be a bit uncomfortable, but rest and relaxation will keep you happy and cherishing the remainder of your pregnancy.

Safe Medications in Pregnancy
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Click here to download a printable version the safe medication list.

Cord Blood Collection
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You can now invest in your family’s future health by banking your baby’s cord blood. Because cord blood is rich in newborn stem cells, banking this blood may be lifesaving to your baby and other family members. Stem cells have a natural regenerative power to heal and are currently being used to treat and cure over 75 life-threatening illnesses. Stem cells collected from the umbilical cord are very important because they make many different types of cells including those that fight disease.

In Arizona, it is the law that providers must educate their patients about cord blood collection, a relatively new procedure that could save the life of your baby or the lives of your family members. The law was passed because cord blood collection has proven to be effective in treating over 75 diseases, including several types of leukemia, cerebral palsy, anemia, and Hurler syndrome. The treatment of these diseases in not an experimental process, but in fact, thousands of people have already benefited from transplantations using banked stem cells. The future looks promising as scientists are certain that ongoing stem cell research will ensure that cord blood collection will one day treat brain, liver, and heart disease.

Cord blood collection is safe for both mothers and babies, painless, and only takes a few minutes after your baby’s birth. After your baby is born, the umbilical cord is clamped at both ends. In the past, the blood remaining in the umbilical cord was thrown away, but now you have the option to collect this blood in special collection bags for storage in private family blood banks or public blood banks. Public cord blood banks are free of charge and allow for the banking of stem cells for all public use. If at any time, stem cells are needed, the public banks will search for a match from all stem cell donations stored at the facility. Private cord blood banks store collected stem cells for private use for an anuual fee. The stem cells remain available at any time for the donator's use in a time of need. Donating your baby’s cord blood for storage is a decision you must make; choosing where to store the stem cells is a personal decision that you must make for yourself after discussing options with your physician. Private banks such as Cord Blood Registry also have sponsored donor programs in which cord blood collection and storage is performed at no cost if you have a family member or a past family history of diseases treatable by stem cell transplant.

Stem cell collection can be equivalent to purchasing life insurance against disease for your family. With the medical advancements that have already been made using stem cell transplants, and with the ongoing research, you can’t afford not to educate yourself about the life saving possibilities that umbilical cord collection may have. To learn more about cord blood collection, please go to www.cordblood.com.

Diet and Exercise in Pregnancy
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Diet and Exercise are vital to a healthy pregnancy and to the health of your baby. Diet is something that should be taken into special consideration before and during your pregnancy, as the nutrients you eat are the nutrients that support the health of your baby. For a complete review of diet and vitamin supplements, specialty diets for vegetarians or lactose intolerance, as recommended by the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, click here.

For years, it was believed that pregnant women should spend nine months resting, avoiding even the slightest exercise. We now know that exercise during pregnancy is proven to facilitate a healthier pregnancy and easier delivery. Not only do women who exercise during their pregnancy deliver healthier babies, but they also drastically reduce their time spent in labor, up to one third of the time of women who avoided exercise during pregnancy. Exercise is extremely healthy and safe during pregnancy, but there are a few guidelines pregnant women should follow during their exercise routines.

  • When beginning exercise in your daily routine, start slowly and listen to your body. If you are used to regular exercise, this can be safely continued on the same level into the first trimester.
  • Always monitor your heart rate and breathing. As a general rule, your heart rate should not exceed 140 beats per minute. If you feel out of breath, which is common during the first trimester, slow down and take a break.
  • Drink plenty of water. Staying hydrated is extremely important in pregnancy, and you will need to even further increase your water intake during exercise.
  • As the pregnancy progresses into the second and third trimesters, reduce the intensity of your exercise regimen. This will happen naturally as your baby grows and your weight increases.
  • In the last trimester, avoid running or jumping. These movements can strain the pelvic floor, which is already carrying more weight than before.
  • Remember to include Kegel exercises in your routine. Kegels involve tightening and relaxing the pelvic floor muscles, and increase support to the bladder, uterus, and intestines. Tighten and relax this muscle several times a day.

Frequently Asked Questions
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Q

Where can I deliver my baby?

A

Dr. Courtney Hunt and Dr. Kim Hartzfeld have privileges to deliver at Scottsdale HealthCare Osborn campuses. Osborn is located next to our office; Dr. Hunt and Dr. Hartzfeld have immediate and timely access to you in your times of need. Because of our philosophy in personalized care, Dr. Hunt and Dr. Hartzfeld like to spend as much time as possible with you during the birth of your baby. At Osborn, your birthing experience will be spent away from the main hospital and in separate, intimate and peaceful family birthing suites that have also been newly redone.

7400 E. Osborn Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85251
(480) 882-4000

Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn - 7400 E. Osborn Rd., Scottsdale, AZ 85251 - (480) 882-4000

 

 

Q

How do I register at the hospital for my delivery? What prenatal classes are offered?

A

At your first appointment, we will provide you with a hospital information and pre-registration binder. You may also pre-register online. This binder will also provide you with information on prenatal classes offered at Scottsdale HealthCare. Click here for the extensive list of offered prenatal classes.

 

 

Q

If I feel sick or have a cold during my pregnancy, are there any medications that are safe for me to use?

A

Yes, there are several over the counter medications that are safe during your pregnancy. Please click here to view the list.

 

 

Q

What should I do if I haven’t felt my baby move in the last three hours?

A

You should feel your baby move or kick throughout your day. If you do not feel your baby move every hour, try to eat a meal and drink fluids, and lie down and rest. If you still do not feel your baby move, please contact our office.

 

 

Q

What genetic testing is offered for me or for my baby?

A

There are several genetic tests available during your prenatal care. Please remember that these tests are not always covered by your insurance company.

 

 

Q

When should I go to the hospital?

A

If at any time during your pregnancy, you experience contractions that are five minutes apart or less, or begin leaking fluid, go to the hospital immediately. Don’t forget to take your delivery bag with you!

Women's Newsletter
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Click here to sign up for a free subscription to the pregnancy newsletter from Scottsdale HealthCare.

 

Desert Jewel Obstetrics and Gynecology - Courtney A. Hunt MD, FACOG - OBGYN - Scottsdale, AZ - Arizona

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©2014 Desert Jewel Obstetrics and Gynecology. All rights reserved. Courtney A. Hunt, MD, FACOG and Dr. Kimberly M. Hartzfeld, DO, FACOG
3501 N Scottsdale Road, Suite 230, Scottsdale, AZ 85251
Tel: (480) 970-1937 Fax: (480) 970-1938

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